AOTS X NUART X MONIKER

NUART X MONIKER talks programme hosted by Art on the Streets

Moniker International Art Fair October 6 2018

A programme of provocative talks and panel discussions from internationally renowned artists, curators and academics, curated by Nuart in partnership with Moniker. Activities include the launch of Faith XLVII’s new book, EX ANIMO, and an exclusive screening of the new BBC street art documentary OBAIR EALAIN (STREET ART).

Murals are an important part of the urban garden, but we also need to understand them as being in symbiosis with, and in debt to, the activist, the graffiti writer, the trickster, the sticker, the paste up, the stencil and the tag. In that sense, Nuart is fiercely protective of the term ‘street art’, no matter how corrupted. The ‘street’ is the grit in the oyster that creates the street art pearl, if you like. Or, as Situationist scholar McKenzie Wark would have it, “the maggot within the fruit.”

– Nuart Director, Martyn Reed

1300 – 1315 NUART JOURNAL LAUNCH EXCLUSIVE LONDON LAUNCH WITH ISSUE EDITOR DR SUSAN HANSEN

Nuart Journal is a peer-reviewed journal built on the foundations of five years of content from the Nuart Plus symposium – the world’s first annual symposium dedicated to street art practice. Nuart has long been a place for catalysing important debates around art in public space that does not fall under the general rubric of traditional public art practice – and for challenging entrenched notions of what art is. The journal strives to bring these conversations to a wider audience. Nuart Journal does not adhere strictly to disciplinary boundaries and publishes contributions from a broad range of authors including cultural heritage workers, urban planners, historians, critics, cultural and human geographers, political theorists, anthropologists, architects, ethnographers, sociologists, psychologists, criminologists, curators, artists, writers, taggers, anarchists, and out and out vandals. www.nuartjournal.com

1315 – 1345: FAITH XLVII BOOK LAUNCH EX ANIMO: THE WORK OF FAITH 47 ARTIST FAITH XLVII IN CONVERSATION WITH NUART

EX ANIMO is a Monograph following a chapter of Faith’s work from 2012 till early 2018. The book is a collection of a diverse range of work from her varied and prolific practice and focusses on the urban mural element of her work. This includes a wealth of studio-based and site specific street pieces such as paintings, installations, prints and mixed media artworks. The rich compilation of images is accompanied by texts which are not only explanatory of the series of works, but intimately delve into the conceptual underpinnings that drives Faith’s practice, as well as highlighting the new and experimental directions her work has taken. The book was constructed by Roger Gastman and published by DRAGO Publishers. EX ANIMO includes a Foreword by Carlo McCormick and text by Juxtapox Magazine’s Kristin Farr.

Faith 47’s kingdom of the wild offers a magical rupture in the fabric of urban decay and renewal… Earthy in tone and substance, her art is, with a wink to the sanctity of suffering, somehow profoundly spiritual in the most unspecific way. A language of empathy borne in a scream of rage, hurled like a Molotov cocktail but given the wings of metaphor and the grace of allegory, Faith’s work on the streets commands all the monumentality of public art yet whispers its deepest secrets in the hushed tones of prisoners and stowaways, travellers whose journeys demark the limits and possibilities of nowhere else to go.

– Carlo McCormick (Foreword to EX ANIMO: THE WORK OF FAITH 47).

13.45 – 1400 BREAK 1400 – 1425: PAPER PROTEST CURATOR ADRIAN BURNHAM (UK)

A whistle stop tour of flyingleaps artists’ street posters with a focus on the visual activism of Dr.D. Unethical politics, abuses of power, the noxious effects of consumer culture: these and more are the targets of artists who have used the medium of street posters. Michel de Certeau’s theories of the everyday note that deploying ‘tactics’ – or small acts of resistance against an imposed order – means being constantly on the watch for spaces within which to manoeuvre. In particular, Dr. D’s work enacts a deflection of power, questions control, and at the same time puts a smile on people’s faces. Adrian Burnham is the founder and curator of flyingleaps, a street display and online platform for socio-politically engaged artists. www.flyingleaps.co.uk

1425 – 1450: BREAKING THE LAW! DR ENRICO BONADIO, THE CITY LAW SCHOOL, CITY UNIVERSITY OF LONDON (UK)

Because street artworks are created and displayed in the public eye, they are vulnerable to copying. Corporate appropriation is particularly risky. The graffiti and street art boom has attracted attention from marketing gurus in their attempt to give their products an “aura” of street credibility. What marketing experts and advertisers may think is: “these murals are placed outside, on the streets, and so they can be freely used and exploited commercially.” They are wrong. Street artists and writers can rely on copyright to protect their art, no matter where it is placed: the fact that they place art in public spaces does not mean that they waive their legal rights. Corporate appropriation and co-option can be stopped and compensation can even be obtained. This talk will explore some recent cases where graffiti and street art have been misappropriated by corporations for advertising and commercial purposes. Street art deserves copyright protection, even when artworks are created illegally and may last only for a short period of time.

1450 – 1515: ICONOCLASH REDUX THE PRODUCTION, CONSUMPTION, AND DESTRUCTION OF STREET ART – 10 YEARS LATER DR RAFAEL SCHACTER, DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, UCL (UK)

‘When people look at my work, when I’m looking at others’, I’m thinking how did they get up there? . . . You want people to be blown away just by the location, you want to get your work on some crazy spot, impossible to get to, and make people think, how the fuck?!’ (Delve). In this talk, anthropologist and curator Rafael Schacter (UCL) revisits some key themes from his influential Iconoclash, a decade later. In 2008, Schacter first shifted the focus of graffiti and street art study away from traditional conceptions and reflections on imagery and appearance, and towards the diverse responses and reactions that they generate – uncovering the underlying motivations and politics behind the act of erecting, and of erasing, graffiti and street-art in our cities and streets.

1515 – 1530: BREAK 1530 – 1600: TRIGGER WARNING! ARTIST CARRIE REICHARDT (UK)

Carrie Reichardt – Ceramacist, Craftivist and more latterly claimed as a Street Artist takes us on a bawdy and insightful journey through over 20 years of art censorship. Her personal reflections on the people, places, institutions and organisations that have rejected, censored or otherwise demanded significant changes to works forms the basis of a presentation that also holds the potential to veer off into other unexpected realms and dimensions. Carrie Reichardt’s public work reflects her sustained engagement with people, place and politics. She draws on local archival sources to create art that resonates with the communities it is set within. She has described her work as a form of “ceramic tapestry” – weaving local people and their histories together. In its radical permanence, her street-based work has a temporality that stands in contrast to the ephemerality of other forms of street art. Reichardt has been awarded the Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship, enabling her to work with local communities in Chile and Mexico. She is also Artist in Residence at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.

1600 – 1620: FROM HERA TO ETERNITY ARTIST HERA (DE)

Artist HERA discusses the development of her work. Jasmin Siddiqui, aka HERA, studied Graphic Design in Wiesbaden, Germany – a highly frequented meeting point for international graffiti artists. By the time she graduated in 2007, Jasmin had already made a name for herself – calling herself HERA after the highest Goddess in Greek mythology. This was a necessary alter-ego, a super-hero-persona. In 2004 HERA met AKUT at a graffiti festival in Spain, and formed the duo Herakut, who continue to paint murals together across the world. HERA’s work has been featured in numerous exhibitions, books and magazines, blogs and television shows. She believes that graffiti saved her life.

1620 – 1650: AND YOU MAY ASK YOURSELF, WELL, HOW DID I GET HERE? PANEL DISCUSSION WITH HERA (DE), FAITH XLVII (SA), CARRIE REICHARDT (UK)

HERA (DE), FAITH XLVII (SA), CARRIE REICHARDT (UK): Three artists from very different backgrounds – academy trained, self-taught and radical outsider. Between them, these internationally renowned artists have produced decades of high impact street based work across the globe – their art is at once aesthetically powerful, instantly recognizable, highly personal, and often political. But to paraphrase David Byrne, how did they get here? Are they living in a shotgun shack, or sitting behind the wheel of a large automobile? And given their growing commercial success, what is the continued attraction of often risky street-based work? How does a personal practice become a political art form? What challenges have they faced in balancing artistic autonomy with curatorial direction and community conservatism? What advice would they give to early career artists working in the streets? Has anything changed? Has everything changed? Join us for this once in a lifetime opportunity to find out.

1700 – 1800: EXCLUSIVE FILM SCREENING OF THE BBC STREET ART DOCUMENTARY OBAIR EALAIN (STREET ART)

Length: 60mins Midas Media for BBC ALBA featuring Phlegm, Snik, Milu Correch, Hyuro, Bordallo II, Dr.D, Carrie Reichardt, Nimi, Glöbel Bros, Ernest Zacharevic, Elki & Bortusk Leer. Producer – Terry Wolsey Editor – Jonny Craigmile Executive Producer for Midas – Patricia Macleod Executive Producer for BBC – Margaret Cameron Twelve world-famous street artists have come from all corners of the globe for one of Europe’s biggest street art events to paint the grey streets of Aberdeen red (and blue, and green…). They have five days, 600 cans of spray paint, 200 buckets of paint and 50 volunteers to help them complete their work before the provocative new street art festival: Nuart Aberdeen “A Revolution of the Ordinary” opens. Edgy, stunning, provocative, subversive; their work has made a real impact. We get behind the scenes to see what makes the artists tick, what inspires their work, how they create their work and how they cope when the weather turns. The results provoke reactions. Some good, some bad, and in one case the art proves just too much and has to be taken down.